Using Social Media To Speak Up with Kristy Gillentine

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#TwitterSmarter Chat Recap: 8-16-18

Here’s a recap of our fave tweets from this week’s informative and insightful chat. We’d love to hear from you! Please feel free to comment below and share your two cents on these questions.

This week’s #TwitterSmarter chat assignment from @KrisGillentine:

Be an awesome friend today 😀Continue this important conversation 🎙#TwitterSmarterAssignment

See next tweet for video recap 👇👇👇 pic.twitter.com/PQlHAJLxoJ

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

Watch the #TwitterSmarter "after" chat replay: https://t.co/0cNcjdGnvo

And be sure to catch the #TwitterSmarterAssignment. Go to the 37:39 mark in the video to hear @KrisGillentine share this week's assignment. ✍ pic.twitter.com/xcx7hRPRHY

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

Please welcome our guest @KrisGillentine. Topic: Using Social Media To Speak Up. #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/DUjwBQoSuR

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

Ask @hootsuite:

We invited our friends from Hootsuite to come on the chat and kick it off by answering one pressing question about Twitter marketing.

Ask @hootsuite: What are ways to boost your organic reach on Twitter? #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/kU5CMNUhdc

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

1|1 Here are some key tips to up your organic reach:🔶 Use appropriate hashtags🔶 Add media to your tweets🔶 Go live! 🔶 Read this blog post to learn more https://t.co/b2ev5HpROW #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/0WO4NhTv1A

— Hootsuite (@hootsuite) August 16, 2018

#TwitterSmarter Chat

Q1: Do you trust the people you meet on social media until they give you a reason not to, or does your trust build over time, and why? #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/2T0j60aE0a

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

A1a Let me start by first establishing that I was manipulated and harassed emotionally and sexually by a man I met on social media, so I'm answering today's questions through that lens…. #twittersmarter

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A1b …But harassment takes many forms on social media: bullying, impersonation, stalking, trolling, dog-piling, etc.

NONE OF IT IS ACCEPTABLE. #twittersmarter

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A1c Social media actually helped me overcome trust issues. Then this happened: https://t.co/l5LsNWsSUS Since I've come to terms with this, the way I approach everyone on social media has shifted drastically. My trust is given very cautiously these days. #twittersmarter

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A1: I start off trusting people I meet on social. But then if they give me a reason not to, I'm out of there. On the positive, I've met so many amazing people through social. But I also know there is a dark side and am glad we are having this conversation about it #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/W8XXDOnXhu

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

A1 Trust builds over time: how can I help you; how can you help me? #twittersmarter

— Toby Metcalf (@Toby_Metcalf) August 16, 2018

A1. I want to give people the benefit of the doubt but I try to be at least a little wary. Its hard I dont want to be cynical but there is rampant fraud online. Its too easy to fake. #TwitterSmarter

— Gene Petrov – Leadership In Social Media Marketing (@GenePetrovLMC) August 16, 2018

A1. This depends on what’s required. I’ll always be friendly and open to conversation, but I wouldn’t begin sharing personal information before building a relationship of sorts. #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/3AJ0bVyDKm

— Lisa 👩🏼‍💻I like big gifs & I cannot lie (@lisaboylesmedia) August 16, 2018

A1: It depends on the circumstances. If I land on a profile and it's loaded with hashtags and gimmicky catch phrases, I have a hard time trusting them. However, more times than not, when I connect & interact with someone, I like to lead with trust! #TwitterSmarter

— Maria Marchewka (@_MariaMarchewka) August 16, 2018

A1 well, my trust is built over time, by looking at the content that is shared, at the kind of language people use. the fact that people don't have their name & pic on the profile is the occasion that asks for more time to trust people. #twittersmarter

— Joana Rita Sousa 🦄 💩💎 (@JoanaRSSousa) August 16, 2018

A1. I give everyone a shot until proven otherwise. I do proceed with caution; however, in terms of sharing information, etc. #TwitterSmarter

— Melissa A.🦉 (@mz_rocko) August 16, 2018

A1: Initially our instinct is to trust people until they give a reason not to. Social media is a place where you meet people from everywhere, and I don't think you can be hesitant at first, just need to jump and explore. #TwitterSmarter

— kununu US (@kununu_US) August 16, 2018

A1. I think much like a friendship in person, a friendship through social media takes time to develop. When talking trust, it requires continued engagement. In my opinion that's the only way you can create a judgement upon whether or not someone is trustworthy. #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/pkhNhgAK3I

— Christopher Tompkins (@chrisgoagency) August 16, 2018

A1. Hi #TwitterSmarter tweople! First time participating! Trust is apart of the relationship– grows stronger or gets diminished, but isn't a one-off kind of thing. I trust my gut instinct when it comes to social but for the most part trust the people I engage with.

— Bri, the Designer (@AyBriBri) August 16, 2018

A1 I have learnt many lessons on SM. I will give people the benefit of the doubt, but traspassing lines of decency, respect and personal space is a no go for me – doesn't matter the age, gender or "authority" and "popularity".#TwitterSmarter https://t.co/M6iDHB9Db1

— Zala Bricelj (@ZalkaB) August 16, 2018

A1: Trust should build over time in any relationship, online or not. The best thing to do is set boundaries, guidelines and red flags for yourself when connecting via #socialmedia. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/uB8fXbeUh3

— Katelyn Brower 🌟 (@BrowerKDnB) August 16, 2018

A1: IRL, I follow that path but, on Social Media, I am less trusting. When I first meet someone on SoMe or before I connect or follow them, I always check out their tweets to try to determine the kind of person they are. If connecting is proven wrong, I unfollow. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/BHHTjueZBj

— Mark Carruthers (@MarkC_Avgi) August 16, 2018

A1: As we say in the Credentialing world, "Trust, but verify." #TwitterSmarter

— Shannon Arturi (@credcollab) August 16, 2018

A1 It's exciting meeting new people in real life and on social. It's one of my favourite things but we should be cautious that that excitement doesn't make us unsafe. #twittersmarter

— Amanda Webb 👩‍💻 (@Spiderworking) August 16, 2018

A1) I find the social media community really welcoming and friendly but I would be nervous about arranging to meet someone in the flesh until the trust had built up – which takes time. #twittersmarter

— Sarah Clay Social. Common Sense approach to Social (@CurlyClay) August 16, 2018

As in person, a little of both. You shouldn't be blindly trusting, but you also can't build relationships in the first place if you don't begin from a place of trust. #DigitalCitizenship #TwitterSmarter A1 https://t.co/nvFxWOM6Lr

— Jeremy Bond (@JeremyDBond) August 16, 2018

A1: I follow the trust but verify method. I have also been stalked online, but it wasn't someone I trusted. I think it is harder when someone you trust turns out to be untrustworthy. #TwitterSmarter

— Kami Huyse (@kamichat) August 16, 2018

Q2: At what point do you think it's justified to block or report someone who's harassing you? #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/y3RXy7evSe

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

A2a If someone makes you feel uncomfortable, you don’t need any explanation other than “this makes me uncomfortable” to tell them to stop and cut off contact. You can block anyone at ANY time for ANY reason – even if you can’t quite put your finger on what it is… #twittersmarter

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A2b YOU decide for you at what point blocking/reporting is justified. No one else does. I've always worried a little too much about others' feelings/reactions… Empathy is an incredibly valuable thing, but shouldn’t come at the cost of your own peace and safety. #twittersmarter

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

YES! No need to explain anything to anyone! As @MadalynSklar would say, "JUST DO IT." #twittersmarter https://t.co/Vtt3jAdVXL

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A2: ANYTIME you are made to feel uncomfortable. ANYTIME someone says something inappropriate to you. Listen to your gut. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/D9b22VSNlV

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

A2. The moment you feel uncomfortable – even in the slightest. Don't wait for it to escalate. be proactive in removing the negativity from your life. #TwitterSmarter

— Gene Petrov – Leadership In Social Media Marketing (@GenePetrovLMC) August 16, 2018

A2. As soon as it happens. Continued engagement can escalate a situation and can be mentally & physically dangerous. 🙁 #TwitterSmarter

— Melissa A.🦉 (@mz_rocko) August 16, 2018

A2- the minute you feel uncomfortable and feel as if the line has been crossed. No need to to justify feelings. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/gpEPtGIquG

— Katie Miller #SMDayHou (@KatieSMiller) August 16, 2018

A2: You don't have to put up with anything especially on social media. If you feel like someone is harassing you, you should block/report them. There's enough negativity out there, you don't have to put up with it if you don't want to! #TwitterSmarter

— Maria Marchewka (@_MariaMarchewka) August 16, 2018

A2 – It's justified RIGHT AWAY if they crossed the line. If it made you feel negatively or uncomfortable, you don't need that in your life! #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/tSf8DMfaU1

— Powers of Marketing💥 (@meganpowers) August 16, 2018

A2: If someone is repeatedly sending nasty or threatening messages on social media, that's why you need to block them. #TwitterSmarter

— Express Writers (@ExpWriters) August 16, 2018

A2: It's your account, if anyone makes you feel uncomfortable on social media block them. If they don't get the hint, report them. You don't "need" justification to block someone (IMO). #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/kivBT0poOM

🎙JMatt (@JMattMke) August 16, 2018

A2: The MOMENT you feel something is off. You know yourself the best – if an action or comment does not sit well with you, do not let it linger and grow into something larger. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/NVROWUR7El

— Katelyn Brower 🌟 (@BrowerKDnB) August 16, 2018

A2: Immediately if you feel uncomfortable. You can wait and see if your feelings and instincts are correct as well. Trust your gut. I know my first reactions have been correct a majority of the time #TwitterSmarter

— Natalia (@tweetingtalya) August 16, 2018

A2. If it crosses your mind to block somebody then do it. I don't think there should be any hesitation. With reporting the person should do something to warrant it, but you shouldn't allow anyone to push you. Twitter is a fun community, don't let others ruin that. #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/uZ6YPTXG5J

— Christopher Tompkins (@chrisgoagency) August 16, 2018

A2. I report tweets that are abusive, exploitive, and represent hatred or violence to a certain group. #TwitterSmarter

— Dr. Dorrie Cooper (@sittingpretty61) August 16, 2018

A2: I will block or report ANYONE I feel is harassing me at ANY POINT if I feel it is justified. Oddly enough, LinkedIn has been my #1 spot for blocking and reporting people. They think it is match over there, PS, its a professional site. BLOCKED #TwitterSmarter

— Shannon Arturi (@credcollab) August 16, 2018

A2: If I am followed by a profile with a bunch of numbers after their name, I block them. Since I have been on Twitter, if I have blocked anyone else, I think it was maybe only 1 person who tried to harass me & I put an end to it & don’t think I had to block them. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/o1lL6M0RIX

— Mark Carruthers (@MarkC_Avgi) August 16, 2018

A2 Your social media, your rules. The second someone says something inappropriate, they got blocked. There are no second chances. Always trust your intuition. #twittersmarter

— Christina Hager (@ChristinaMHager) August 16, 2018

A2. – At the point where a discussion turns personal– If someone is being defamatory– If there is a lack of respect for one's religious, sexual or political opinions#TwitterSmarter

— Virtuoso Assistant 📩 🎨 (@VirtuosoAssist) August 16, 2018

A2: I think trusting your gut should be more than enough to take action #twittersmarter

— Sabrina Cadini (@SabrinaCadini) August 16, 2018

A2: The moment you feel violated or harassed. You can’t play around with these types of situations. It will progressively get worse. No one deserves to feel uncomfortable on social media. #TwitterSmarter

— Leah Hunt (@Leah_Hunt_PR) August 16, 2018

A2) I don't see why it's not justified to block ANYONE who's harassing you, period. For most of us, access to our accounts should be a privilege, not a right. I do think of public officials differently. #TwitterSmarter

— Jeremy Bond (@JeremyDBond) August 16, 2018

Q3: Do you have firm relationship boundaries established for yourself and others on social media? #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/udVBUkyqFn

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

A3a I learned the crucial importance of boundaries through my own bad experiences, and I’ve since defined very firm boundaries for myself and others on social media.

It’s important to keep our relationships, conversations and even use of emojis in check…. #twittersmarter

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A3b For example, may seem silly but I’m less generous w/❤s now – especially with men, and I only send 😘s to family. With everything we say online -even down to the emoji/Bitmoji we use- context is SO important, and implications can be too easily misunderstood. #twittersmarter

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A3c Your boundaries are up to YOU, and how you enforce them is up to YOU… It’s up to each of us to protect ourselves, but we have to decide individually what that looks like for us. #twittersmarter

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A3: After seeing what my good friend @KrisGillentine went through, I think about this more now. So little things like it's easy for someone to misunderstand a GIF or an emoji, so I try to use them carefully. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/AyihfMoyYP

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

A3 i have boundaries for myself, about sharing private information (like my location). #twittersmarter

— Joana Rita Sousa 🦄 💩💎 (@JoanaRSSousa) August 16, 2018

A3 The only ones I have are: I won't add you on Facebook if we haven't actually met in person; that's a true FRIEND space for me… and on LinkedIn, if you didn't give me a valid business reason to connect? Unlikely I'll accept. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/9RmD1uLZdG

— Powers of Marketing💥 (@meganpowers) August 16, 2018

A3. This is such a good question, and one I do have a conversation w/ my students about in regards to ethics + etiquette.

You got to set your own personal boundaries on social media. If you feel uncomfortable at all – it's best to walk away. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/QUSwmuHzei

— Karen Freberg, PhD • #SMprof, Consultant + Author (@kfreberg) August 16, 2018

A3: Absolutely!! There are only a small handful that I would tell certain things, and those things are said via DM’s rather than tweets. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/m4YqL9Z32M

— Mark Carruthers (@MarkC_Avgi) August 16, 2018

A3. I'd like to think so. It's important to engage but it's also worth your time to ensure you are protecting your physical and mental state as well as ensuring you are also mindful of other's feelings/boundaries, etc. #TwitterSmarter

— Melissa A.🦉 (@mz_rocko) August 16, 2018

A3. – I tend to set very strict boundaries on Facebook.– It's all about trust; when you're letting someone into your personal 'space' you have to be sure they don't abuse it at some point– Relationships sometimes turn sour: don't show your hand to everyone#TwitterSmarter

— Virtuoso Assistant 📩 🎨 (@VirtuosoAssist) August 16, 2018

A3: I absolutely have set boundaries, you have to in life and on social. Just don't let anyone cross those boundaries or you need to cut them out of your life or block/report them. #TwitterSmarter

— Shannon Arturi (@credcollab) August 16, 2018

A3. Whatever I am not comfortable sharing, I don't. And the moment I think something has crossed a line, I'll call it out (politely initially, and then more forcefully). Any sensitive that needs sharing I'll move to DM. #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/JZKfmHDqUs

— Lisa 👩🏼‍💻I like big gifs & I cannot lie (@lisaboylesmedia) August 16, 2018

A3. I think you have to especially if you confront trolls, bots, and spammers. Just like in public, if someone performs an offensive, then one needs to respond swiftly and earnestly with a consequnce from strength, not fear. #TwitterSmarter

— Dr. Dorrie Cooper (@sittingpretty61) August 16, 2018

A3. I am happy to talk about my personal life up to a certain point. I have a family and they are important to me, but I dont go into all the daily ups and downs (except for a select group of people that I trust 100%). #TwitterSmarter

— Gene Petrov – Leadership In Social Media Marketing (@GenePetrovLMC) August 16, 2018

A3: Yes, I don't add people to my personal FB profile or LinkedIn unless I know you in person OR we've collaborated on a project online. Even then, I still may be hesitant. But those are my only two accounts that aren't open to anyone. #TwitterSmarter

🎙JMatt (@JMattMke) August 16, 2018

This is an important component of #DigitalCitizenship. I'm naturally somewhat guarded both online and off. #TwitterSmarter A3 https://t.co/QvoFbQGuJI

— Jeremy Bond (@JeremyDBond) August 16, 2018

A3: I do have boundaries. I don't talk about my kids online at all. Also, I don't meet people alone that I haven't already had plenty of IRL contact with first. #TwitterSmarter

— Kami Huyse (@kamichat) August 16, 2018

A3) It is easy to get carried away with emoji's and positive words but you are all right, we need to be careful. I give away some information about myself but I keep a lot private too. Anyone can read your tweets after all. #twittersmarter

— Sarah Clay Social. Common Sense approach to Social (@CurlyClay) August 16, 2018

A3 I also have different "rules" for myself and others on various channels. On Twitter I set myself up as completely public, but also know that I use it for work. That is my brand, so I don't often talk about my fam (and if i do, it's very light #TwitterSmarter

— Christina Hager (@ChristinaMHager) August 16, 2018

Treat social media like any other communication: be respectful & consider if you'd want your tweet to show up on the front page of the news.a3.#TwitterSmarter https://t.co/EdLd2mN1n9

— carrie maslen (@carriemaslen) August 16, 2018

A3. Yes. I DO NOT engage in activities which will hurt other people, DO NOT connect with people who do the same, DO NOT participate or engage with such people as well #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/yp0uuhL27P

— Vivek Nair (@vivektweetsso) August 16, 2018

A3. Data & privacy breaches over the past few years have been a wake up call for a lot of us. There are few things we engage with or use as consumers that don't collect information about us in some way. As far as boundaries I do more to 'own' my digital narrative. #TwitterSmarter

— Bri, the Designer (@AyBriBri) August 16, 2018

Q4: What happens if your harasser is a friend or someone who has a lot of mutual friends? How do you handle it? #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/3h1YR7Sl8v

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

A4a What happens if your harasser is a friend? …THEY'RE NOT. How do you handle it if your harasser has a lot of mutual friends? …Tell someone. Stand up for YOU. No one gets a free pass to harass others because of who their friends are. #twittersmarter

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A4b My harasser and I had tons of mutual friends. I kept quiet for over 2 years because I thought it was just me. I was afraid people wouldn’t believe me, that it was my own fault, or that I was somehow misinterpreting his words/actions… #twittersmarter

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A4c But it seems I wasn't alone. There were (at least) 35 additional women (making accusations), and each of us thought we were alone. All it took to get the ball rolling and bring ALL of this to light – for all of us – was me telling 1 person. #twittersmarter

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A4: In my experience we had mutual friends but I wasn't close to any of them so I muted them all rather than blocked, that way I can keep an eye out especially if they showed up on this chat. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/yubEzTGtMY

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

A4. I dont know honestly. I have not had to do this. It is a tough spot to be in. But the important things is to share with someone close that it is going on. #TwitterSmarter

— Gene Petrov – Leadership In Social Media Marketing (@GenePetrovLMC) August 16, 2018

A4: If they are a "friend" – I would send them a DM or take the conversation to text and address it there. If it continues, then hey – time to drop that "friend" from your life. People change – for better or worse, all the time. #TwitterSmarter

🎙JMatt (@JMattMke) August 16, 2018

A4 If the harasser is a friend, I send a DM letting him/her know a line has been crossed #twittersmarter

— Toby Metcalf (@Toby_Metcalf) August 16, 2018

A4. Once the situation is clear to both parties, it's important to distance yourself from the harasser as much as possible. Make clear to friends of the situation. Being your friends, they should back you up and disapprove of the actions taken by the harasser. #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/UQIbQCv6cw

— Christopher Tompkins (@chrisgoagency) August 16, 2018

A4: If someone in a group of Social Media friends steps “out of line”, I have spoken with one or more of the group in a DM to find out if I might have misinterpreted what was said & try to understand why this person said what they did. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/M7lADWUNim

— Mark Carruthers (@MarkC_Avgi) August 16, 2018

A4. That has actually happened to me recently

– I don't 'confront' the individual or ask questions– I mute their SM profiles but I try not to 'unfollow'– I allow mutual friends to make up their own minds about me without trying to influence them.#TwitterSmarter

— Virtuoso Assistant 📩 🎨 (@VirtuosoAssist) August 16, 2018

A4. I'm not sure I understand why someone would be 'friends' with a harrasser, but understand it can be complicated when mutuals are involved. I'd still block them, but let the mutuals know my reasons (ONLY IF it was relevant for them to know). #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/brlC82Rbu0

— Lisa 👩🏼‍💻I like big gifs & I cannot lie (@lisaboylesmedia) August 16, 2018

A4 I think it depends on the situation and person(s) involved. I have heard and seen professionals who stand for professionalism & transparency do the exact opposite in "action" or dismiss incidents as over-reactions, women's things etc.#TwitterSmarter https://t.co/WTVkrLMYPj

— Zala Bricelj (@ZalkaB) August 16, 2018

A4) I have been lucky enough not to have this happen to me but I'd like to think I would spread the word whoever they were. #twittersmarter

— Sarah Clay Social. Common Sense approach to Social (@CurlyClay) August 16, 2018

A4: You can’t possibly stop people from being friends, so that’s when the good ole block/mute button comes in handy. Depending upon my relationship with the mutual friends, I would voice my concerns to the friend, making them aware of harassers behavior. #TwitterSmarter

— Leah Hunt (@Leah_Hunt_PR) August 16, 2018

A4. I do a quick check with some of the common friends about the person. Has he done anything similar with them? #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/eINZFIaJLE

— Vivek Nair (@vivektweetsso) August 16, 2018

A4 Yes, I agree with this. It becomes crystal clear who your real friends are if they know all the information and continue to support someone who is clearly harassing you. #TwitterSmarter

— Christina Hager (@ChristinaMHager) August 16, 2018

Q5: How do you know if someone is being honest about who they are or putting on a "show" on social media? #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/VSnSrGpF7r

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

A5 Sadly, you don’t always know. You can't always know. No matter how innocent or kind or fun or friendly or selfless a person may seem, all you see is what they want you to see – what they portray themselves to be. A persona – not the REAL them. Online and IRL. #twittersmarter

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A5: I watch how they present themselves on social. How they interact with others. It's important to keep your eyes open. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/YRnGzf0MEw

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

A5: The best advice is to always be cautious. You can never be too careful when making connections online. #TwitterSmarter

— Express Writers (@ExpWriters) August 16, 2018

A5 In addition to the words used, I take a good look at the profile: is the person real, is this a parody account? #twittersmarter

— Toby Metcalf (@Toby_Metcalf) August 16, 2018

A5: As scary as it is, most of the time you just don’t really know. This is why it is so important that social media professionals, like ourselves, need to continue to yell “be authentic” from the rooftops. Buzzword or not – authenticity really is the answer. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/Hml3HyFY9u

— Katelyn Brower 🌟 (@BrowerKDnB) August 16, 2018

A5. Wow! That is a tough one. It is so easy to misrepresent online. I would go with this idea: time reveals character. But also pay attention to the other person's words, mannerisms, body language. These could be indicators of untruthfulness. #TwitterSmarter

— Gene Petrov – Leadership In Social Media Marketing (@GenePetrovLMC) August 16, 2018

A5: This is a GREAT question! There are subtle signs like following and then unfollowing, not engaging, etc. But I think it takes some time to REALLY know if someone is putting on a "show" and what their true intention is. #TwitterSmarter

— kununu US (@kununu_US) August 16, 2018

A5 well, lots of years at social media and the answer is "gut feeling". i'm really sensible to language. i'm a detail person, it's the little things #twittersmarter

— Joana Rita Sousa 🦄 💩💎 (@JoanaRSSousa) August 16, 2018

A5: If you know them IRL, you can tell what's a show and what's real. But, introverts in-person can be extroverts online (and visa versa). I don't really care "who" you are online as long as you're not a bully! #TwitterSmarter

🎙JMatt (@JMattMke) August 16, 2018

A5: To be honest, you can't really know until you know. You just need to be aware and take action, if needed. #TwitterSmarter

— Kami Huyse (@kamichat) August 16, 2018

A5. Hard to tell, but look out for red flags. Those putting on a show will display themselves similar to spammers. Additionally I think someone who is putting on a show is much more prone to talk about themselves rather than issues or topics around them. #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/3ji1JGUGcF

— Christopher Tompkins (@chrisgoagency) August 16, 2018

A5. I think this is where consistency is so important and some investigative work in the form of research:Examine TweetsFollowersAdvance SearchPoor historian in the form of consistency of self-disclosureProvocativeDouble Entendre's #TwitterSmarter

— Dr. Dorrie Cooper (@sittingpretty61) August 16, 2018

A5. #TwitterSmarter

Sometimes it is clear and sometimes it is not. Have your ears and eyes open… specially online as it is a platform that allows for people to easily present a 'fake persona' but like I say, it is a matter of time till the ball drops. https://t.co/ojbxWvpNU2

— Natasha G. (@nplusg) August 16, 2018

A5: If they are good at hiding “Mr. Hyde”, & you have moved the online relationship forward to find out they are not who they say they were, or are not like their online presence, It’s the old “ Fool me once…fool me twice” scenario.🤷‍♂️ #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/AI5OSNPPMR

— Mark Carruthers (@MarkC_Avgi) August 16, 2018

A5. A good indication is looking in their 'Tweets and Replies' section to see how they engage with others and what they overall Twitter etitquette is. It won't catch out everyone, but you'll spot the trolls straight away. #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/LhP5dvFP4L

— Lisa 👩🏼‍💻I like big gifs & I cannot lie (@lisaboylesmedia) August 16, 2018

A5. I always do a quick research on the person…. What they are upto…. What do they do… Where they write… With whom they engage… Common friends etc #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/L2iAaOfkAV

— Vivek Nair (@vivektweetsso) August 16, 2018

A5. – I tend not to listen to anyone who says their an expert in a subject unless they can back it up– I don't listen to folks who brag about their successes: "empty vessels make the most noise"– Dishonesty can make someone inconsistent with what they post#TwitterSmarter

— Virtuoso Assistant 📩 🎨 (@VirtuosoAssist) August 16, 2018

A5. To be authentic is trending on social these days and I see so many webinars on how to be yourself online, it makes me wonder where the disconnect happens. TL;DR you never know but that’s true offline as well. #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/jpuojlLq9o

— LANA 🙅🏻‍♀️ (@iamlanapark) August 16, 2018

A5 I think only time can tell.But there are small things that give people away. Especially when they say something and do something else. Also, pay attention to what others observe about sb's behaviour – especially towards you – it can be telling. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/Tu8bwdSHNu

— Zala Bricelj (@ZalkaB) August 16, 2018

A5 This is terrible…but I assume most people are "putting on a show" on social. You just have to decide if what they are showing you feels "right" or wrong to you and act accordingly. #TwitterSmarter

— Christina Hager (@ChristinaMHager) August 16, 2018

A5: You can’t really tell initially- but over time it becomes obvious. #TwitterSmarter

— Tim Lewis @ Stoneham Press (@StonehamPress) August 16, 2018

A5- That’s just it, I guess its hard to know for sure. I may be simplistic here, but I trust my gut feeling. If my inner radar goes off, I’m backing off. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/KLB47cJ6wR

— Katie Miller #SMDayHou (@KatieSMiller) August 17, 2018

Q6: Do you think there's a social media #metoo or #timesup movement coming? #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/jhgpbTOg6a

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

A6a I think there should be. The social media community needs to demand zero tolerance for predatory behavior. It’s too easy for predators hide behind their social media personalities, friendships and influence…. #twittersmarter

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A6b My harasser was putting on a show, pretending to be something he wasn't. I was putting on a show too, pretending everything was fine. But we need to work to bring this issue out of the dark…It’s time to tell harassers, stalkers & abusers to #stoptheshow. #twittersmarter

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A6: I agree with @KrisGillentine, there should be a social media movement so we can keep the conversation going. It's an important one! #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/roSnsgqOrd

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

A6: "Coming" those movements are already here… but if it's to put anonymous users on blast for inappropriate comments – it already happens. Plenty of people don't put up with it, if you're particularly trolly. I personally am on team "Block and Move On". #TwitterSmarter

🎙JMatt (@JMattMke) August 16, 2018

A6. I would hope there's something brewing already. With the huge issue of social media bullying being addressed (but not solved!) years back, I'd hope that harassment is taking steps towards a movement as well. #TwitterSmarter

— Christopher Tompkins (@chrisgoagency) August 16, 2018

A6 Great question @MadalynSklar & a very tough one. People want open conversation without harassment #twittersmarter

— Toby Metcalf (@Toby_Metcalf) August 16, 2018

A6. Wow. That question impacted me. I don't see how it couldn't happen. We spend so much time on social media. So much occurs. I think it could and will happen. This is a great conversation. #TwitterSmarter

— Melissa A.🦉 (@mz_rocko) August 16, 2018

A6: YES! Interesting how the hashtag, which comes from social media, is changing the landscape in-person but hasn't fully been implemented in the place where it start. #ThursdayThoughts #TwitterSmarter

— kununu US (@kununu_US) August 16, 2018

A6: If not, there should be, so people learn how to protect themselves online and perpetrators are stopped.#TwitterSmarter

— Darcy De Leon 👩🏻‍💻 Blog Editor (@darcydeleon) August 16, 2018

A6: Honestly, I think that the fact we are having this conversation at all is a direct result of the #metoo movement. It has given women the courage to speak up! #TwitterSmarter

— Kami Huyse (@kamichat) August 16, 2018

No industry is immune to #metoo or #timesup . Awareness, empathy, & respect should be commonplace.A6. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/KW2RwfgFzh

— carrie maslen (@carriemaslen) August 16, 2018

A6: Unfortunately, the movement will eventually cover all “venues”, both IRL & online because these “jerks” (I am being kind) are everywhere & need to be called on their words & actions. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/uEM39ePwvY

— Mark Carruthers (@MarkC_Avgi) August 16, 2018

A6. Honestly, I think we have some time until there's a crisis or terrible breach of trust, data, or more elections interference. Just no accountability on a widespread scale. #TwitterSmarter

— Dr. Dorrie Cooper (@sittingpretty61) August 16, 2018

A6. I'm skeptical about these trending and emotive subjects because people can manipulate them for their 5 minutes of 'fame'. We need to be very careful who we accuse on social media as potentially it could ruin lives. #TwitterSmarter

— Virtuoso Assistant 📩 🎨 (@VirtuosoAssist) August 16, 2018

A6: Absolutely! Conversations such as these bring awareness. Connecting with others that have faced similar situations is empowering. #TwitterSmarter

— Leah Hunt (@Leah_Hunt_PR) August 16, 2018

#MeToo tackles a specific issue and I wouldn't want to dilute what it means. I do think we have to reckon with online hate, and together we'll find a way to tear it down. #TwitterSmarter A6 https://t.co/29qeIVrhnE

— Jeremy Bond (@JeremyDBond) August 16, 2018

Q7: How important is having a community that supports you when you’re faced with challenging situations? #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/1ZcSTZB9Re

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

A7a My community has been incredibly encouraging, understanding and comforting since I came forward with my story, and it’s been a very emotional, difficult, traumatic journey – even WITH all of their support… #twittersmarter

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A7b Even if all my friends and followers had turned their backs on me when I clicked “publish” on my outcry post, I knew I had to do it. My top goal was to prevent others from feeling the way he made me feel, and I believe I achieved that goal. #twittersmarter

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A7c Having a community to support you through challenging situations is important, but being willing to risk it all to do what’s RIGHT is more important, in my opinion. #twittersmarter #chatsnap

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A7: Community is everything! In times of need, they will support you. 11 years ago I was faced with a major health crisis and my community was there for me. It was an incredible experience. Don't be afraid to ask your community for support in your time of need. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/lj9pE00gDF

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

A7: I LOVE when your community comes to your defense when a troll is being rude. If your community can shut down the haters without you even getting involved, that is the ideal outcome! #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/wLjZASXmB8

🎙JMatt (@JMattMke) August 16, 2018

A7. I think it would be incredibly difficult to get through such an ordeal (online harassment) without a strong community (and close family members/offline friends). Support and encouragement is so valuable. #TwitterSmarter

— Gene Petrov – Leadership In Social Media Marketing (@GenePetrovLMC) August 16, 2018

A7. We all need communities to support us – and we need to be #givers to others. #TheGoldenRule#TwitterSmarter https://t.co/vdbUrf0ABO

— carrie maslen (@carriemaslen) August 16, 2018

A7 A strong community pushes out the bad seeds #twittersmarter

— Toby Metcalf (@Toby_Metcalf) August 16, 2018

A7. Life is about perspective. Everyone around you has a different perspective and they've also learned from different experiences throughout their lives. Always appreciate what your friends and community has to say. #TwitterSmarter

— Christopher Tompkins (@chrisgoagency) August 16, 2018

A7: Community is EVERYTHING. Sometimes, you can't get through situations without community. People in numbers can have incredible impact, as we all know. #TwitterSmarter

— kununu US (@kununu_US) August 16, 2018

A7. It's key and it is important to have your community and real friends there to support you always. You got to have your tribe where they are able to provide their take and insights on what is going on. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/wPQKR2NQYv

— Karen Freberg, PhD • #SMprof, Consultant + Author (@kfreberg) August 16, 2018

A7. #TwitterSmarter

Extremely important.Your support system is crucial. https://t.co/6Y1Kh43Bq3

— Natasha G. (@nplusg) August 16, 2018

A7 it's really important, so we can feel safe. sometimes we spot that someone is harassing a friend and we can act as a community. this way, we can discourage this behaviour at an earlier stage. #twittersmarter

— Joana Rita Sousa 🦄 💩💎 (@JoanaRSSousa) August 16, 2018

A7) I love my community on twitter and I know I could approach them with a problem or a tricky situation. #twittersmarter

— Sarah Clay Social. Common Sense approach to Social (@CurlyClay) August 16, 2018

A7: Having a supportive community is everything. It feels good knowing you have people that are there for you and will always have your back. #TwitterSmarter

— Express Writers (@ExpWriters) August 16, 2018

A7: If you are (or thought you were) in a Social Media community, if the words & actions of the populous of the community are not supportive of your issues, then I would say that you are really not part of that community & you need to move on. 🤷‍♂️#TwitterSmarter https://t.co/eoiV7DN1by

— Mark Carruthers (@MarkC_Avgi) August 16, 2018

A7. I am so proud to be a part of #SMBesties (you know who you are!) and I feel privileged to offer my support whenever I can. I certainly couldn't do without you all – it's heart-warming to know you are there if I need your help…or just a belly laugh! #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/dxzKTSCKb8

— Virtuoso Assistant 📩 🎨 (@VirtuosoAssist) August 16, 2018

A7: very important. That is the one great advantage with social is that there are groups for everyone to share and learn #TwitterSmarter

— Bernie Fussenegger 🐝✌the7⃣ (@B2the7) August 16, 2018

A7. If I am not supporting someone or fail to do something, then if we are true respectful contemoraries then let me know! I am human and make mistakes, so let me know if I can help! #TwitterSmarter #WeLeadEd https://t.co/ZbpnwBaZPG

— Dr. Dorrie Cooper (@sittingpretty61) August 16, 2018

A7- In any situation the support of community is extremely important. We need to take care of relationships both business and personal. Community helps us to grow and become leaders. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/4xIg4MLydA

— Katie Miller #SMDayHou (@KatieSMiller) August 17, 2018

Q8: What can all of us here today do to help bring an end to harassment on social media? #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/jrDxlnzPl8

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

A8a Please keep this important conversation going! Talk about it on your chats, podcasts, livestreams, blogs, etc. Encourage people to trust their guts, speak up, speak out – and support those who do. #TwitterSmarter

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A8b Predatory behavior shouldn’t be tolerated – I don’t care how many followers you have or books you’ve published or keynotes you’ve given… none of that allows you to victimize anyone. #twittersmarter

— Kristy Gillentine (@KrisGillentine) August 16, 2018

A8: It's important to keep this conversation going. Don't be afraid to discuss this with your friends and colleagues. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/0jqkjTqvxO

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

A8 Report accounts – take control of your Twitter feed #twittersmarter

— Toby Metcalf (@Toby_Metcalf) August 16, 2018

A8. More discussion and awareness on this topic is key. I also think it's necessary to verify our connections and see if they are who they say they are. Are they a friend, or a "friend" who does not have your best interests at heart. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/Zmv4r4CXxv

— Karen Freberg, PhD • #SMprof, Consultant + Author (@kfreberg) August 16, 2018

A8: We can stand up for each other to shut the hate down. Strength in numbers. #TwitterSmarter

🎙JMatt (@JMattMke) August 16, 2018

A8: well tweeting at today's chat, sharing our thoughts is a way of creating awareness around this topics. and have a strong attitude. when i spot something strange, here on tw, i usually say "well, not on my shift". and i try to handle with, along w/ my community #twittersmarter

— Joana Rita Sousa 🦄 💩💎 (@JoanaRSSousa) August 16, 2018

A8: Having good people in your corner is always positive. The real magic can happen beyond the community with advocates. #TwitterSmarter

— Greg Ortbach (@GregOrtbach) August 16, 2018

A8: People tend to follow the vast majority, if more and more of us start to hold people accountable it is inevitable that change will take place. And for the better! Let's practice what we are preaching here. #Twittersmarter

— kununu US (@kununu_US) August 16, 2018

A8. There’s strength in numbers. So let’s hold everyone accountable. Learn from 👑 B and her hive. #TwitterSmarter pic.twitter.com/Ukf7RcICxY

— LANA 🙅🏻‍♀️ (@iamlanapark) August 16, 2018

A8. Make it a point to keep "social" alive in social media; never hurt anyone with a word even; be empathetic and caring for other individuals and not keep money "always" as your motive to be on social media #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/HUq7p6yRO3

— Vivek Nair (@vivektweetsso) August 16, 2018

A8. Realize that nobody's beliefs are wrong. If you believe something, it is your opinion and your ideology only. Learning from other perspectives is a key point in feeling out who to trust, who to associate with, and molding you into who you are. #TwitterSmarter

— Christopher Tompkins (@chrisgoagency) August 16, 2018

A8. #TwitterSmarter

AwarenessSupportInformSupport https://t.co/f4LwxTuJBs

— Natasha G. (@nplusg) August 16, 2018

A8: Talk about it! Never be afraid to live your truth. Shout it loud that harassment will not be tolerated on any platform. #TwitterSmarter

— Leah Hunt (@Leah_Hunt_PR) August 16, 2018

A8 It's beyond a chat hour.Start by:Tweet how you wish to be tweetedRespect other, keep the rules of engagement clear & professionalSpeak up – be of help & support to those who are experiencing something Take a stand – don't go quiet if this person is famous#TwitterSmarter https://t.co/WPrXEDiYYb

— Zala Bricelj (@ZalkaB) August 16, 2018

A8) Establishing ground rules, talking about it will help too. I think the platforms should take more responsibility for poor behaviour on their channels. #TwitterSmarter

— Sarah Clay Social. Common Sense approach to Social (@CurlyClay) August 16, 2018

A8- Stop ignoring behavior that we think is “odd but uncomfortable” Set standards for ourselves and hold to them. Let others know what your standards are. #TwitterSmarter https://t.co/kt7xgY96KR

— Katie Miller #SMDayHou (@KatieSMiller) August 17, 2018

Thank you everyone for a great hour of sharing. #YouRock! We'll see you back here next week on the #TwitterSmarter chat. pic.twitter.com/6m6Ln6vBBL

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

We have another great #TwitterSmarter chat guest lined up for next week. Mark your calendar. Our guest will be @JKatzaman. pic.twitter.com/oYUsFNDN2S

— Madalyn Sklar 🚀 Digital Marketing Coach (@MadalynSklar) August 16, 2018

For more tips, advice and resources to help you master Twitter and grow your business be sure to follow me at @MadalynSklar. I’m also available for one-on-one and group coaching and consulting. Get details here.

Be sure to join us every Thursday on Twitter at 1pm ET at hashtag #TwitterSmarter.

Madalyn Sklar, Twitter Advisor

The post Using Social Media To Speak Up with Kristy Gillentine appeared first on Madalyn Sklar – Twitter Marketing Strategist.

Read more: madalynsklar.com

Will is the Executive Managing Editor at Feedster. Will and his team from Full Epic Lead Generation work with venture capital, marketing co-ops, and companies to attract and gain qualified leads.

His primary focus on developing a sales funnel for a company and finding out of the box / growth hacking style ways to convert and drive traffic.

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